My First Release Weekend

At the time of writing this post, I am 41 years old, I’ve been in the business of writing software for over 20 years, and I have never ever experienced a release weekend. Until now.

It’s now nearly 1 pm. I’ve been here since 7 am. There are a dozen or so different applications which are being deployed today, which are highly coupled and maddeningly unresilient. For my part, I was deploying a web application and some config to a security platform. We again hit a myriad of issues which hadn’t been seen in prior environments and spent a lot of time scratching our heads. The automated deployment pipeline I built for the change takes roughly a minute do deploy everything, and yet it took us almost 3 hours to get to the point where someone could log in.

The release was immediately labelled a ‘success’ and everyone starts singing praises. As subsequent deployments of other applications start to fail.

This is not success!

Success is when the release takes the 60 seconds for the pipeline to run and it’s all working! Success isn’t having to intervene to diagnose issues in an environment no-one’s allowed access to until the release weekend! Success is knowing the release is good because the deploy status is green!

But when I look at the processes being followed, I know that this pain is going to happen. As do others, who appear to expect it and accept it, with hearty comments of ‘this is real world development’ and ‘this is just how we roll here’.

So much effort and failure thrown at releasing a fraction of the functionality which could have been out there if quality was the barrier to release, not red tape.

And yet I know I’m surrounded here by some very intelligent people, who know there are better ways to work. I can’t help wondering where and why progress is being blocked.

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